American Slang


Here are some new Daily Useful American Slang


Eats


Definition:

Food, particularly simple, inexpensive food.

Example:

1) I’m hungry. Let’s get some eats !
Etymology: You eat food. This slang term turns a verb into a noun.
Synonyms: grub


Fall for


Definition:

To become infatuated with somebody; to develop intense feelings for someone; to become romantically attached.

Example:

1) I think I fell for that cute guy I met last night.

Definition:
To be fooled; to believe a false story.

Example:
1) You didn’t fall for that advertisement about making money on the Internet, did you?


Fat cat


Definition:

A person who has great wealth and power; a tycoon.

Example:

1) Many of the city’s fat cats eat at that steak restaurant on First Avenue.

2) Those fat cats in Washington are going to keep pressuring Congress to pass the tax bill.

Etymology:

This term comes from the 1920s, when it was used to describe wealthy contributors to American political parties.

Synonyms:

big shot


Glued to your seat


Definition:

To be extremely interested in something; to be so involved with something that you cannot move.

Example:

1) As soon as the movie started, Holly was glued to her seat.

Etymology:

‘Glue’ is a sticky substance that holds things together, so if you are ‘glued to your seat’ you are stuck in your chair due to your great interest in what you are seeing or hearing.


Hangout


Definition:

To pass time idly; to loaf with pleasure, at ease.

Example:

1) We spent the weekend just hanging out at my pad.

READ ALSO:  The Roots of Honour Summary , Explanations and Questions and Answers

2) We’ll leave soon. Just hang out for a minute.


Have eyes for


Definition:
To desire; to find someone physically attractive.

Example:

1)I think my boyfriend has eyes for another woman.

Etymology:

You see with your ‘eyes’, and when you ‘have eyes for’ somebody, you really like what you see.


Head doctor


Definition:

A psychiatrist; a doctor who helps people with mental problems.

Example:

1) I’ve been seeing a head doctor for several years.

2) You seem emotionally disturbed. Maybe you ought to see a head doctor?

Etymology:

Psychiatrists are medical doctors who treat the mind, which is related to the brain, which is in the head.

Synonyms:

shrink


High five


Definition:

A way to say ‘Bravo!’ or ‘Good job!’ by slapping someone’s hand in the air; to congratulate someone.

Example:

1) Nice shot! High five, dude!

2) High fives all around on the excellent presentation at the meeting!

Etymology:

There are five fingers on your hand, and you lift your hand high into the air to give a ‘high five’. This is a common gesture first used by African-American basketball players and now used by many people in a variety of contexts. You can also give a ‘low five’ or go ‘down low’ after giving someone a high five.


Hit the road


Definition:

To leave; to go home. Also used as a command meaning ‘go away’ or ‘leave me alone’.

Example:

1) It’s getting kind of late, so I think I’m going to hit the road.

2) Hit the road, bub. I’m not looking for a boyfriend.

Etymology :

In this phrase, ‘hit’ refers to the physical contact between your feet and the road ( the pavement you walk or drive on ).

READ ALSO:  The Speed Master By Robert Frost - Summary and Analysis

Synonyms :
skedaddle


Hit the spot


Definition:

A phrase that means ‘that was really good’ or ‘that was just what I needed’.

Example:

1) Mmmm – that cup of coffee really hit the spot !

2) I needed a good laugh, and that slang cartoon really hit the spot.

Etymology:
‘The spot’ refers to a need you might have, like hunger. When you get some food, you have addressed or taken care of that need – or ‘hit the spot’. The term is usually used for food and drink, but also for other kinds of pleasures, such as entertainment.


Hole in the wall


Definition:

A small, simple place, particularly a shop or restaurant.

Example:

1) Let’s go to the Italian restaurant on Smith Street. It’s just a hole in the wall, but the food is excellent.

Etymology:

This phrase has been used since the early 1800s. A ‘hole’ is an empty space, and a ‘wall’ is part of a building. So a ‘hole in the wall’ is a simple, undecorated space in a building.

x