What is figurative language?

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What is figurative language? 3Tabasum
asked 3 months ago
2 Answers
Mohammad Afzalsmartenglishnotes Staff answered 3 months ago
Figurative language
Figurative language is language that is used beyond its literal meaning for effect or to create an image in the reader’s mind. Figurative language can also reveal aspects of a character’s traits. Depending on the context, figurative statements can show humor or sarcasm. Read each definition and the example made by a character commenting on a newly broken arm.
Some Types of Figurative Language and Examples
Hyperbole: an exaggeration to make things appear greater or lesser than they really are. e.g., 
It was the only bone in my body I hadn’t broken yet.
Metaphor: a comparison that says one thing is another, e.g.,
The cast is a cocoon for the transformation of my arm.
Simile: a comparison using the words
like or as, e.g.,
My arm snapped like a popsicle stick.
Pun: a joke based on the different possible meanings of a word or what a word sounds like, e.g.,
i. As you can see, I like to do things single-handedly.
ii. Seven days without water makes on weak.
Allusion: a comparison to a historical,
mythical, or literary person or event, e.g., 
Mom is taking good care of me. She’s a
regular Florence Nightingale.
Mohammad Afzalsmartenglishnotes Staff answered 3 months ago
Figurative language
Figurative language is language that is used beyond its literal meaning for effect or to create an image in the reader’s mind. Figurative language can also reveal aspects of a character’s traits. Depending on the context, figurative statements can show humor or sarcasm. Read each definition and the example made by a character commenting on a newly broken arm.
Some Types of Figurative Language and Examples
Hyperbole: an exaggeration to make things appear greater or lesser than they really are. e.g., 
It was the only bone in my body I hadn’t broken yet.
Metaphor: a comparison that says one thing is another, e.g.,
The cast is a cocoon for the transformation of my arm.
Simile: a comparison using the words
like or as, e.g.,
My arm snapped like a popsicle stick.
Pun: a joke based on the different possible meanings of a word or what a word sounds like, e.g.,
i. As you can see, I like to do things single-handedly.
ii. Seven days without water makes on weak.
Allusion: a comparison to a historical,
mythical, or literary person or event, e.g., 
Mom is taking good care of me. She’s a
regular Florence Nightingale.
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